DIY rag quilt – the easiest quilt ever!

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diy-rag-quilt2Rag quilts are quick, fun and gorgeous! If you can sew a straight line, you can sew one of these!

Get out your scrap fabric stash and whip up one of these gorgeous quilts. Use it as a picnic blanket, a sofa throw, or make one for a gift.

rag-quilt2Materials and Supplies

  • Fabric scraps
  • Sewing thread
  • Sewing machine (I used my Brother NV950 but a simple sewing machine will do the job)

You can have both sides of your quilt matching, or solid back and print top. If you want a solid back, you must cut the same number of squares in a solid fabric to mirror all of your front squares or rectangles. If you want the same on both sides, cut twice the number of squares or rectangles, front and back of each piece.

Printed fabrics have a lighter side. Remember, that side will show (at the seams), so choose your colours with this in mind. Most of the time the lighter side creates a soft muted look after you clip the seams and wash.

Regarding fabrics, Quilting 101 suggests: “To make a rag quilt you need materials that are likely to fray and unravel when washed vigorously. Anything with a loose weave is good, flannel is very popular or even squares made up from old jeans.”

Note: Pre-wash all fabric prior to cutting. If you are mixing fabric types, some fabrics shrink more than others.

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Instructions for Construction

  1. Seam allowances are typically ½ inch (1.3cm), though some prefer ¾ inch (2cm) or 1 inch (2.5cm). Experiment with scrap material to discover which you prefer.
  2. Personal preference whether to use batting or no batting. Heavier winter quilts might be cozier with a thin layer of batting. Lightweight summer quilts will be fine with just the flannel alone.
  3. Each square will be sewn with the wrong sides together. You are assembling the front and backside of your quilt in one step. REMEMBER – your finished seams will show!
  4. If you want the edge of your quilt to be “raggy”, run a decorative stitch around the outside edge to prevent the seams from opening up. If you’re going to attach a finished border, now would be the time to sew that on.

Read more details about rag quilting from Quilting 101 here

More projects from Brother Sewing

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